An overview of Connecticut workers’ compensation benefits

In Connecticut, almost all employees are covered by the Connecticut Workers' Compensation Act, which provides benefits to workers injured on the job or who develop a work-related disease. This article provides an overview of the benefits possibly available to workers, but anyone who may have a claim should consider getting more information from an attorney with experience in workers' compensation claims.

Who is eligible for workers' compensation benefits?

The Connecticut Workers' Compensation Act provides benefits to full-time and part-time employees, including minors, regardless of the industry, the size of the employer or how long the worker has been employed at the business. A key exception is for workers in a private home who do not work more than 26 hours a week, but generally all employees are covered from their first day on the job.

When are workers' compensation benefits available?

Workers' compensation benefits may be available to workers who are injured in the course of their employment, to workers who acquire an illness or disease through their work or to workers whose conditions are worsened because of their jobs. Workers do not have to prove negligence by their employer or another employee to receive benefits, and workers may even receive benefits if they caused their injury in an accident.

What types of benefits are available?

Several types of workers' compensation benefits are available, depending on the extent and the duration of the injury, illness or disease. First, workers' compensation provides payment for the worker's medical treatment. Then, depending on the employee's ability to return to work, wage replacement payments may be obtained by the worker.

Temporary total disability benefits are available to workers who are temporarily unable to work but will who recover and return to their jobs. Temporary total disability benefits pay 75 percent of the worker's pre-injury average weekly wage.

Temporary partial disability benefits are available to workers who cannot return to their pre-injury jobs but who are able to do some other type of work or perform the same job with reduced hours. Temporary partial disability benefits pay 75 percent of the difference between the amount the worker is currently earning and the amount he or she would be earning without the injury.

Permanent partial disability benefits are available to workers who experience permanent partial loss of use of a body part because of the injury. The benefits paid depend on the body part that was injured and the degree of disability caused by the injury.

Additional benefits may be available for relapse or recurrence of an injury or illness, job retraining and vocational rehabilitation, as well as travel expenses and time away from work for medical treatment.

If you were injured at work or have acquired a work-related disease or illness, it is important to act quickly on your claim. Contact an experienced workers' compensation lawyer for guidance.